South Florida Real Estate Blog by Shari Orland, Realtor

One Word Keeps Cropping Up about Selling Delray Beach Homes

The word is “clutter.” It keeps cropping up whenever a Realtor is asked for advice about selling Delray Beach homes.

The clutter factor might not seem to be so overpoweringly important. After all, a housekeeping crew can scour and shine most homes in a day or two–and that would seem to outrank the clutter component by a mile. So why all the fuss about clutter?

I believe the reasons are many. Of course, selling any Delray Beach home requires it to be at least freshly cleaned (best if immaculately so)—but everyone accepts that without a second thought. Clutter is another matter. It goes to what’s meant by the term.

After a home has been prepared in every other way, de-cluttering action means ruthlessly removing just about everything that tends to attract attention, fill the space, or otherwise distract the eye of the beholder.

In the living room, that means gathering up all the books and newspapers and removing them from the scene. It means doing away with the ashtrays, paperweights, and coasters. It means losing the magazine rack by the fireplace and pruning the number of throw pillows that usually populate the big sofa. It means dispensing with unnecessary throw rugs and any hall wall hangings that make narrow hallways more claustrophobic. Importantly, it means removing all the photos and memorabilia that make your house a home—because they make it your home when you want it to become their home. 

The same goes for the kitchen, where it means gathering up all the paraphernalia that’s needed to fix a breakfast or throw lunch together. Salt and pepper shakers, spice rack on the sink, egg timer and spoon rest included. Does this make the kitchen appear less...

Will Tomorrow’s Boca Raton Real Estate Be Much Like Today’s?

No one needs convincing to agree how much buying and selling Boca Raton real estate has changed since we entered the 21st century. Not only can you review homes for sale whenever you wish but you can also use Boca Raton real estate sites like this one to compare properties by all sorts of metrics.

This consumer-friendly advance was actually foreseeable in 1999. It was the subject of plenty of forward-looking commentaries. So it’s not hard to imagine that the glimpses into real estate’s future that Forbes’ panel of experts came up with last week could actually come to pass. The published piece promised “Six Ways Tech Could Change the Real Estate Process,” but the six panelists saw similar advances. The progress came in three areas:

  1. Artificial Intelligence will help agents instantaneously adjust documentation to conform to legal requirements. Florida and Boca Raton laws are in fact subject to change—so I am definitely in favor of this one!
  2. Remote Transactions will become even more thoroughly supported so that searching, viewing, purchasing and even closings will be able to be conducted remotely. A second expert described essentially the same advance as “Time and Distance Removal.”
  3. Disintermediation. This six-dollar word entered the vocabulary when people started talking about the “Bitcoin” and “blockchain” phenomena. The word means dispensing with unnecessary processes in a transaction—and in Boca Raton real estate, that could apply to aspects of title insurance and home loan...

What One Boynton Beach Listing Detail Has to do with Hong Kong

Our Boynton Beach listings contain one figure that’s quite useful for apples-to-apples comparisons of the properties being offered. This one is quietly tucked away beneath the more prominent pieces of information. It doesn’t usually draw much attention, although it probably deserves more. And last week, it also happened to prove how fortunate home shoppers in Boynton Beach really are—especially compared to what their counterparts have to contend with in places like Hong Kong.

That point was evident in a feature on the CBS Overnight News TV show. It dealt with current real estate reality in the Chinese enclave of Hong Kong. The details were truly gasp-worthy—especially the one we were describing earlier. That one—the figure that doesn’t get much attention—is the cost per square foot. Most house hunters have in mind a price limit they will be willing to spend as well as a general idea of the amount of space they need—a square footage number. Those two factors help them zero in on the homes they’ll be interested in exploring further; it’s why those figures are up near the top of the listing.

But also useful is the cost per square foot. It can help online house hunters get a relative idea of how a slightly smaller home might stack up, price-wise, against a slightly larger one. If you also compare it with another figure, the average sale price per square foot in the surrounding community or zip code, you get another view of the offering. If the listed price per square foot is starkly higher than comparable properties, it might signal a home of much higher quality—or sellers who have an unrealistic idea of what their home is worth. Likewise, a considerably...