South Florida Real Estate Blog by Shari Orland, Realtor

5 Signs that Your Kitchen Needs an Update

 

 Every  Realtor® has heard this observation from a selling client more than once: “Now that I’ve fixed the place up, it’s so nice to live here!” It’s sometimes followed by a wistful, “I should have done it years ago!” They don’t need to add, “so we could have enjoyed it ourselves.”

The culprit has to be human nature—at least the part that resists spending money improving something that works (even if it doesn’t work all that well). One of the prime areas where this tends to hold true is in Boca Raton kitchens.

Since it’s generally acknowledged that the kitchen area is one place (if not the place) that gets the most intense scrutiny from prospective buyers, it is also one of the first areas that sellers decide to update. For anyone who might decide to sell within the next few years, that makes a pretty good argument to go ahead now while you can enjoy the upgrades yourself.

Since everyone tends to get used to our households as-is, it can be helpful to step back and consider where “as-is” could also be “has-been.” Here are five leading signs that your kitchen would benefit from an infusion of energy:

1.      Although everything is there (somewhere), you waste time every day rummaging for kitchen tools and ingredients. Cure: more counter and cupboard space.

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Financing Options available through our Lenders

Bankruptcy, Foreclosure & Short Sale Waiting Periods

If you've lost your home to a financial hardship, we may be able to get you into a new home sooner than you think.

FANNIE MAE
  • Chapter 7 Bankruptcy | 4 years from discharge or dismissal date
  • Chapter 13 Bankruptcy | 2 years from discharge date, 4 years from dismissal date
  • Foreclosure | 7 years from completion date
  • Short Sale (Deed-In-Lieu) | 4 years
FREDDIE MAC
  • Chapter 7 Bankruptcy | 4 years from discharge or dismissal date
  • Chapter 13 Bankruptcy | 2 years from discharge date, 4 years from dismissal date
  • Foreclosure | 7 years from completion date
  • Short Sale (Deed-In-Lieu) | 4 years
FHA
  • Chapter 7 Bankruptcy | 2 years from discharge date
  • Chapter 13 Bankruptcy | One year of the payout must elapse and payment performance must be satisfactory. Buyer must receive permission from the court to enter into a mortgage.
  • Foreclosure | 3 years from completion date
  • Short Sale (Deed-In-Lieu) | 3 years from completion date
USDA
  • Chapter 7 Bankruptcy | 3 years from discharge date
  • Chapter 13 Bankruptcy | One year of the payout must elapse...

Boynton Beach Real Estate Acronyms Include These Puzzlers

 

Buyers and sellers are more well-informed than ever before due to easy access to online Boynton Beach real estate sites (like mine—and BTW, thanks for stopping by!). Given the advent of constantly updated listing data and the abundance of accompanying commentary and analysis, it’s no surprise that the level of real estate sophistication is significantly higher than it was even just a few years ago. It also means that more members of the general public are likely to find themselves in the puzzling presence of some real estate alphabet soup that haunts realms formerly visited only by real estate and mortgage industry professionals.

True: it’s easy to query Google to decipher acronyms like “DHSC.” But then you’ll have to wade through red herrings like “Doctor of Health Sciences” and “Defense and Homeland Security Consortium”—or even Deployment Health Surveillance Capability (that’s from Munich, Germany, but it’s listed as a possibility). Real estate’s “DHSC” is short for Direct Home Selling Costs”—meaning the combined selling expenses (carrying costs, loss on sale, repairs and improvements, commission, closing costs, etc.) all lumped together in one succinct 4-letter package.

Here are some common real estate-related acronyms you may come across from time to time:

HUD/RESPA—The statement you get at the closing table which spells out all the monies paid out and received: short for “Housing and Urban Development/Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act.”

PMI—The kind of insurance borrowers pay for home loans of more than 80% of the property’s value: short for “Private Mortgage Insurance.”

TOM-When a listing is taken off the market because of illness, travel, repairs, etc.: “Temporarily Off Market.”

PITI—the four...

Tips to Save Energy and Add Value

When it comes to energy efficiency, look for smart features and expertise to help you save energy and money and add value to your home.

1. Begin with a Right-Sized Home.

If the home you buy is simply too large for you or your family’s needs or plans, you stand a good chance of wasting energy through excessive heating and cooling costs. If it’s too small, you’ll feel cramped and uncomfortable. It’s a big investment, so seek balance and buy it “right” from the outset. 

2. Purchase Energy Star Appliances Such as Your TV, Dishwasher, Washer and Dryer, and Microwave.

And especially the refrigerator, as it alone contributes about 10 percent of the energy use in a home. Also, unplug electronics not in use or turn off power strips to avoid phantom charges. 

3. Install Efficient Lighting Such as Compact Fluorescent (CLF) or LED Bulbs in Every Fixture.

Lighting accounts for about 6 percent of an energy bill each year.

4. Get an Energy Audit and Have Tests Performed to Identify Ways of Improving Your Efficiency.

You can always upgrade your heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system as well as your thermal envelope, which includes insulation, windows, and doors  and the seals or weather stripping around them. Visit energy.gov/energytips for more tips.

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